In-reply-to » I was musing today about how to solve the problem of projects going stale on github. It really is an annoying problem if you depend on a project where the main maintainers go absent without passing the project on to someone else. The project becomes trapped and dead. Usually (and rightfully), only the maintainers can push releases that can be used by a wider community. But that means if you're depending on a ruby gem or an npm package or a java jar or any other build artifact on an official channel, you're out luck because the release artifacts are no longer updated once the maintainers go absent. People can submit pull requests, but with no maintainers to accept them, the source code goes stale too. Though you can grab the pull release(s), the merge process often requires project-specific knowledge that has gone absent with the maintainers.

One approach to this problem that does work is to have a large stable of maintainers, which reduces the probability that all maintainers go absent simultaneously. Most projects don’t have that, though.

So it would seem that having a way of transferring control of a project from absent maintainers to aspiring active maintainers would be very nice to have. You don’t want that control to pass into the hands of some arbitrary person. But, let’s say there are people who are not currently maintainers issuing pull requests; and there are users submitting issues. You could imagine a mechanism whereby the pull request issuers can be “promoted” by community consent, where the community is the people submitting issues and other pull requests, plus anyone else who wants to be involved perhaps.

There are obviously dangers, but I don’t think they are meaningfully different from the dangers that already exist in the github model of software development. Maybe I’ve overlooked something important though.

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I was musing today about how to solve the problem of projects going stale on github. It really is an annoying problem if you depend on a project where the main maintainers go absent without passing the project on to someone else. The project becomes trapped and dead. Usually (and rightfully), only the maintainers can push releases that can be used by a wider community. But that means if you’re depending on a ruby gem or an npm package or a java jar or any other build artifact on an official channel, you’re out luck because the release artifacts are no longer updated once the maintainers go absent. People can submit pull requests, but with no maintainers to accept them, the source code goes stale too. Though you can grab the pull release(s), the merge process often requires project-specific knowledge that has gone absent with the maintainers.

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UnifiedPush

I think UnifiedPush is coming along nicely, but I wonder why they don’t talk about IOS. The Conversations XMPP app for Android can now function as a UnifiedPush distributor, which is very cool–that means that any app that supports UnifiedPush can send notifications to you via XMPP instead of using Google’s proprietary spyware crap.

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In-reply-to » is there any way to get the total uptime of all time? not from a reboot to another, but all cumulated? #openbsd

@prx@si3t.ch I was curious about this too, and here’s what I found for Linux. I’d suppose there are equivalents in OpenBSD?

  1. run sudo tune2fs -l BLOCK_DEVICE | grep 'Filesystem created:' on a BLOCK_DEVICE whose filesystem was created at 1st machine use
  2. run smartctl -a BLOCK_DEVICE | grep Power_On_Hours to check the total power-on hours of some BLOCK_DEVICE that’s been up since the machine’s 1st use

Obviously these both depend on having a block device (disk drive usu) whose life span is close to the machine’s total uptime. There are utilities like tuptime in Linux, which I think are also compileable on OpenBSD, that you can install when you first start up a machine to keep this cumulative uptime but that doesn’t help after the fact unless you solve time travel!

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In-reply-to » I just posted this on LinkedIn in response to a survey from a colleague of mine asking whether ChatGPT should be credited as a co-author on papers:

@eaplmx@twtxt.net I can appreciate that you might not mean it this way, but this post sounds condescending and arrogant. Just so you know. If a native English speaker said something like this to me, my response would be “fuck you.”

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In-reply-to » I just posted this on LinkedIn in response to a survey from a colleague of mine asking whether ChatGPT should be credited as a co-author on papers:

@eaplmx@twtxt.net Your comment betrays a whole universe of assumptions about me, including that I do not regularly leave my comfort zone. I find this objectionable, and I am going to ask you to stop doing that because it bothers me. If you continue to say things like this to me I’ll have to block you.

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In-reply-to » I just posted this on LinkedIn in response to a survey from a colleague of mine asking whether ChatGPT should be credited as a co-author on papers:

@eaplmx@twtxt.net I did try. I believe you are being unclear and I don’t understand why. I have to tell you, just to be fully honest, that I think you are accusing me of things unfairly, and I object to that. I also think you have done this before on this site. It’s fine if you don’t like what I think, or how I think about things, or how I express myself. I’m happy to experiment with communication styles that work better. But it sure sounds to me as though you are suggesting, vaguely and without admitting to it, that I am not empathetic, not gentle, and not helping people. If that is not what you’ve been saying, then I’m sorry I misread but you really ought to clarify because it’s what I’m coming to believe.

I hear what you’re saying about scarcity. You don’t know me, nor my background, so please be careful with your assumptions on that point. I did grow up in the US, and the US is extremely privileged in many ways, but those privileges are not universally distributed. I’d also point out that I am coming from the perspective of a credentialed computer scientist who feels a responsibility to his field, and I am operating in the context of using words and rhetoric, a tool available to everyone. I don’t have degrees from fancy schools like Harvard or MIT that give my words extra weight; if I did I wouldn’t be writing this on yarn.social, I’d be writing this in the New York Times.

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In-reply-to » I just posted this on LinkedIn in response to a survey from a colleague of mine asking whether ChatGPT should be credited as a co-author on papers:

@eaplmx@twtxt.net I’m don’t understand what you’re saying, since I literally am trying to empathetic and work together (with my computer scientist colleagues) for a better world?

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I am so so so sick of rich people in Silicon Valley driving what people think “computer science” is. Which is exactly what’s happening with ChatGPT, and is what happened with cryptocurrency, web3, “deep learning”, ………..

But I don’t know what, if anything, can be done about that. Many of my computer scientist colleagues contribute to this! Generally, we’re not organized to counter the bizarre claims that are pushed into the media by SV snake oil salesmen.

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In-reply-to » I just posted this on LinkedIn in response to a survey from a colleague of mine asking whether ChatGPT should be credited as a co-author on papers:

I couldn’t help but add a second response after I saw someone throw up their hands and say this is the “state of the world” now:

The state of the world is what we make it. As computer scientists, we have a responsibility to hold the line against this maniacal hype. It’s insane, in an almost literal sense, for us to follow the herd on this particular issue. We know better. We know all about just-so stories. We know about mechanical Turks. We’ve been through half a dozen or more AI hype cycles where the latest thing, whether it be expert systems or case-based reasoning or cybernetics or the subsumption architecture or neural networks or Bayesian inference or or or…., was going to replace the human mind. None of them have become that, to a one, and ChatGPT won’t either.

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I just posted this on LinkedIn in response to a survey from a colleague of mine asking whether ChatGPT should be credited as a co-author on papers:

  1. ChatGPT does not have a conception of what is going on in the world. It is a word-emitter that tricks human minds into thinking it does. In other words, it’s a kind of complex automaton, a marionette. The fact that the action of it is complex enough to fool us into thinking it “knows” something does not mean it does
  2. ChatGPT is as likely to emit false information as true information (perhaps more so; has this been assessed?)
  3. ChatGPT does not have deductive or inductive logical reasoning capabilities; nor does it have any “drive” to follow these principles
  4. Human papers are for human writers to communicate to human readers. It seems to me that the only argument in favor of including ChatGPT in this process is a misguided drive to speed up the process even more than publish-or-perish has. In fact it should be slowed down and made more careful.
  5. The present interest in ChatGPT is almost entirely driven by investor-fueled hype. It’s where investors are running after the collapse of cryptocurrency/web3. There is a nice interview with Timnit Gebru on the Tech Won’t Save Us podcast, titled “Don’t Fall for the AI Hype” that goes into this if you’re curious. As computer scientists, we should not be chasing trends like this.

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In-reply-to » Salty.im Blob Storage v1 - HedgeDoc 👈 Updated this doc a bit more today with @abucci's help 🙏 Kind of need everyone's help though (please) to help with the threat modelling part, and any other feedback comments of course 👌 Still some work to do...

@prologic@twtxt.net I’m not sure what you’re asking but it never registered with me before that salty uses saltpack. I guess thsrs why it’s called salty huh? 🤦‍♂️

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Release v3.3.0 - New theme and improved usability · Jacalz/rymdport

I’ve been playing around with this version of Rymdport, which is a cross-platform GUI for magic-wormhole, and it seems pretty nice. I’ve been able to send files between several different Linux computers as well as between a computer and my phone with it.

One really nice feature is the direct support for sending text snippets. This is a good way to “securely” send something like a password from one computer to another. I say “securely” because you still have to communicate the wormhole code to the recipient, which of course could be intercepted and abused. The upshot though is that (a) you will know if someone connected to and downloaded whatever it was you sent, which allows for some amount of tamper detection; (b) the connection, once established, transmits data and closes without you having to do anything special, so there’s no chance that data is accidentally left available to the world.

The wormhole cli can receive text and sends it to stdout, so you’d probably want to do something more sensible with that if you send a password (like pipe it into a password manager or some other downstream receiver).

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I wonder whether Gio UI would be a good way to build a cross-platform for yarn.

This talk, which is about wormhole-william generally, has a segment about why he chose to use Gio UI to build the smartphone versions of the app. The link should take you to that spot but if not it starts at the 10:22 minute mark. “I was able to go from no experience to yes I can turn this into a working app in a very short period of time”.

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In-reply-to » Salty.im Blob Storage v1 - HedgeDoc 👈 Updated this doc a bit more today with @abucci's help 🙏 Kind of need everyone's help though (please) to help with the threat modelling part, and any other feedback comments of course 👌 Still some work to do...

@prologic@twtxt.net @xuu@txt.sour.is Have a look at this page for inspiration. Among the nice things he discusses:

  • Box: “Package box authenticates and encrypts small messages using public-key cryptography”
  • Secretbox: “Package secretbox encrypts and authenticates small messages”
  • Saltpack: “Need to encode, transmit, or store encrypted or signed data? saltpack is a streamlined, modern solution, designed with simplicity in mind. It is easy to implement & integrate”
  • Magic wormhole: “This package provides a library and a command-line tool named wormhole, which makes it possible to get arbitrary-sized files and directories (or short pieces of text) from one computer to another”.

The first two are Go libraries so may be of special interest. Saltpack was put forward by keybase, but it’s also a format that can be implemented in any language. Magic wormhole is implemented in either python or rust; the protocol is described here.

Update: I just found a Go implementation of magic wormhole: wormhole: “Package wormhole provides a magic wormhole client implementation.”

Update 2: Found another one! https://github.com/psanford/wormhole-william

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